Tom Bie is the founder, editor, and publisher of The Drake. He started the magazine in 1998 as an annual newsprint publication based in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. He then moved it to Steamboat, Colorado (1999), Boulder, Colorado (2001), and San Clemente, California (2004), as he took jobs as managing editor at Paddler, Senior Editor at Skiing, and Editor-in-Chief at Powder, respectively. Tom and The Drake are now both based in Denver, Colorado, where The Drake is finally all grows up(Swingers, 1996) to a quarterly magazine.

California Drains Delta Habitat Project

California’s Bay Delta Conservation Plan includes an ambitious scheme to build massive twin tunnels through the California Delta. The idea is to transport—or steal, depending on your viewpoint—water from the Sacramento River to Central Valley farmers and thirsty cities in SoCal. Estimates for the plan range from $15 billion to over $60 billion. Until now, included…

Idaho Creeks Released from Rehab

In 1992 Idaho’s Bucktail and Blackbird creeks looked like bad acid trips, running shades of neon blue and green. Neighboring Panther Creek had formed a lethal “chemical dam” and all three streams were devoid of salmon, trout, and insects. Regional biologist Chris Mebane says, “It was about as lifeless as you can get outside of…

Oregon Dams Slated for Demolition

Two more deadbeat dams are slated for demolition, beginning this summer. Fielder and Wimer dams on Evans Creek, a key spawning tributary in the Rogue River basin, have inhibited fish passage for over 100 years. Sitting derelict the last four decades, breeching both dams will open 70 miles of steelhead and salmon spawning grounds. Federally…

BNP DD

National Parks for Bahamas Bonefish

America’s National Park System includes more than 400 areas covering approximately 84 million acres. Hundreds of millions of visitors enjoy these protected lands annually, and within their borders development ends, species like buffalo roam, and native trout live free and prosper. National parks are awesome that way and they are not limited to the U.S. NP…

Save Dorado

#savedorados

Golden dorado are streamer junkies feared by skittish baitfish everywhere. In the Salta Region of northern Argentina, they are also threatened by overharvest, habitat degradation, and poorly understood ecological factors. A new study led by a team from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst Department of Environmental Conservation, aims to address those concerns in order to preserve the species…

Fly Fishing Utah Stream Access Laws

Fly Fishing Utah Stream Access Laws

Anglers Win Access in Utah

Good news arrived last night when Utah Stream Access Coalition (USAC) announced it won its longstanding Weber River case. Judge Keith Kelly of Utah’s 3rd District Court confirmed that the Weber is navigable where it crosses over the landowner defendant’s properties, which means that the resource BELONGS TO ALL OF US. “In the 26-page decision, the…

Montana Wild

Montana Went Wild. It Worked

In 1974, Montana killed the hatchery machine and curbed trout stocking. Thanks to trailblazing efforts of steadfast biologists like Richard Vincent, wild fish, on rivers like the Madison, have since flourished. In the Montana Story: 40 Years of Success, filmmaker Shane Anderson details how going wild works and raises the question: Why not? Stay tuned…

bristol bay DD

Pebble Seeks PR Magic for Unpopular Mine

Pebble Limited Partnership (PLP) has played another card from its ever-thinning deck. It has retained the services of Clintonian Secretary of Defense William Cohen (who worked with Bill from 1997-2001) and his company the Cohen Group, which, “assists multinational clients from all sectors to pursue business opportunities and overcome problems in quickly changing markets around…

Rusty

Rusty Fly

Meet Keys’ captain, Derek Rust, in the latest flats-fishing edit from Dan Decibel. Says the filmmaker, “Every time we fish, we always have an awesome time on his boat. We look for bonefish, permit and tarpon when the weather allows. Whether we catch fish or not, you can always bet on some crap talking during…

natty sanct

Miracle Grow

In another “screw you” to congress, the Obama administration recently approved a massive expansion of two marine sanctuaries off the California Coast. In the works for over a decade—and with overwhelming local support—the Gulf of the Farallones and Cordell Bank national marine sanctuaries will more than double to become an area nearly the size of…

Occupy Skagit

Occupy Skagit

Unlike New York’s Wall Street, Washington’s Skagit River is unpaved, graft free, and doesn’t have a namesake movie starring ’80s-era Michael Douglas. It does, however, have a steelhead population that’s doing better than it was following ESA listings that led to closures more than 5 years ago. Now, grassroots groups like Occupy Skagit are calling…

smoky np

National Park is Open for Brookies

All waters inside Great Smoky Mountains National Park boundaries, for the first time in more than 80 years, are open to brookie fishing. The announcement by park officials follows last week’s reopening of 8 miles of Lynn Camp Prong—a section that was sidelined due to a seven-year native brook trout restoration project. “The opening of…

Chuitna Use

Chuitna: More Than Salmon on the Line

Alaska’s Chuitna River watershed—bookended between Cook Inlet and Anchorage—is rich with salmon. It’s also a potential cash conveyor belt for developers who plan to tap its coal-laden underbelly and build export terminals to feed overseas demand. (Namely, to China.) The short film Chuitna chronicles the journey of conservation-minded anglers fighting to put pristine wilderness and anadromous…

Deschutes

Deschutes Disappearing

This short film by photographer Scott Nelson highlights the highs and lows of Deschutes River waters. Before the dams went in, the Deschutes flowed a fairly consistent 700 to 800 cubic feet per second (cfs) year-round, said Brett Hodgson, district biologist for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife in Bend. There would be occasional increases…

hosed

Egg Sucking Leeches

There’s gold in them thar waters. And Idaho miners and politicians aim to suck it.  Last week an Idaho House committee advanced a bill to permit suction dredging in some of the most pristine rivers in the west. The Middle Fork of the Salmon, Clearwater, and Lochsa rivers are among the waters with protected salmon, steelhead, and…