Tom Bie is the founder, editor, and publisher of The Drake. He started the magazine in 1998 as an annual newsprint publication based in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. He then moved it to Steamboat, Colorado (1999), Boulder, Colorado (2001), and San Clemente, California (2004), as he took jobs as managing editor at Paddler, Senior Editor at Skiing, and Editor-in-Chief at Powder, respectively. Tom and The Drake are now both based in Denver, Colorado, where The Drake is finally all grows up(Swingers, 1996) to a quarterly magazine.

NZ

Melancholic Dodding

Thinking about New Zealand makes us miserable. Mostly because it seems so far away. And we’re not there fishing it. Watch the video and prepare to ache. Via Frontsidefly: This video is made of scraps from a trip in 2011/12 to New Zealand. I’ve felt so depressed over the winter that edits such as this…

Knot

Forget Me Knot

One hundred miles from Dillingham, Alaska. One hundred hours of filming during the summer of 2012. Camille Egdorf delivers a short film spanning a trout- and salmon-rich season on the Nushagak River. “The summer of 2012, I dedicated over 100 hours to filming and documenting the experiences that not only I had but also of…

Jackson

A Jackson Saga

The can-of-worms transactions and transitions between former Snake River Float Trips/ Jack Dennis Fishing Trips and the new Grand Teton Fly Fishing shop in Jackson has finally come full circle in the form of a new website, guiding business, and miniature retail outlet in the Dave Hansen Whitewater building at Broadway and Milward. Paul Bruun details the saga…

Rahr1

6-Pack and Salmon with Guido Rahr

Guido Rahr was raised from smolt to adult by flyfishing-obsessed family members in Portland, OR. Tying flies and fishing were his passions. He went on to work for the Nature Conservancy, completed grad school, and eventually migrated back to his homewater on the Deschutes. At that time, in the early ’90s, salmon faced hard times.…

KW

Keys: Economies of Scales

What’s a Florida Keys flat worth? Or how about healthy populations of tarpon, permit, and bonefish that frequent its shallow-water habitats? The answer is big bucks, according to a new study from the Bonefish & Tarpon Trust. BTT states that flats-fishing is a significant money generator in the Keys, contributing more than $249 million to local…

GB2

Grizzly Eats GoPro

Alaska-based scientists come closer to curing grizzly bear halitosis thanks to the recent introduction of mint-flavored GoPro cameras. Via Brad Josephs: “When using a GoPro to capture unusually close footage of grizzly bears for the Great Bear Stakeout for BBC, I had a young bear actually chew on the camera. Amazingly there was no damage…

Puckett Opener

6-Pack With Paul Puckett

Replace Tony Montana’s coke smeared machine gun with a big brown. Substitute a Big Lebowski pistol grip with fish slime and fins. And swap Eastwood’s smoking barrels with a ballistic redfish and you have a good sense of fishing artist Paul Puckett’s mindset. Puckett recently moved from Atlanta, where he was working at The Fish…

Fishhead

FishHead App

Clinching second place next to Beer Pong HD at the esteemed “2013 Drake App Awards” the FishHead Mobile App ($6.99) delivers real-time beta on tides, moon phases, and weather, as well as river flows, gauge heights, and water temps. Points off for not vibrating when you catch a fish. You’ll need to download Koi Pond for…

SeaSwallow

Sea-Swallow’d

Via filmmaker Ryan Peterson: “The Clean Water Act grants the EPA authority to protect these salmon and the 14,000 jobs that depend on them, by disallowing the Pebble Mine to go forward. You can help give voice to Bristol Bay, Alaska by submitting a comment in SUPPORT of the US EPA’s Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment.…

Pebble

Why Pebble is the Pits

Bruce C. Switzer is the former head of environmental affairs for Cominco Ltd.—the company that sold Pebble Mine to Northern Dynasty for “peanuts” in 2001, citing environmental worries and the low-quality ore available at the site. In his column “Compass: Pebble Can’t Work for Alaska” he details a bogus permitting process and the risks associated with this…

snakehead

Op-Ed: Snakehead

Living the dream has become a Big Apple nightmare for us snakeheads. Just yesterday I scooted my torpedo-shaped torso up the bank to maul a mallard with my morning espresso and was affronted by a gaggle of screaming children. No shit. It’s true we like to eat—a lot—and we breed with more gusto than a Kardashian…

LC

A Lowcountry Film Project

Peep the upcoming film project from Lowcountry Journal for tails in the grass and the people and places that bind us. Watch it Via Lowcountry Journal: “Over a little Hometeam BBQ what slowly began to materialize was a story I could begin to see in my minds eye. It looked amazing, and even better it…

montana

Access on Trial: Update

On Monday, anglers and access stakeholders packed MSU Bozeman’s Strand Union building for Montana’s High Court hearing on the James Cox Kennedy v. State Stream Access Law snafu that will play a precedent setting role for future recreational river use across the state and beyond. In a nutshell: Kennedy’s lawyer, Peter Coffman, argued that Montana…

River Hope

River of Hope

Drake contributor John Larison, see “American Muddler” in the Spring 2013 issue, travels to the Oregon coast for a swing down memory lane in this short clip from Shane Anderson’s documentary River of Hope. Logging interests have slashed the once lush forest that lined the banks of this unnamed river. In the aftermath: spiked water…

Cox

Cox Blocking

This smiley guy again? You bet. The obese-pocketed Montana stream access nemesis, James Cox Kennedy, is back with his Supreme Court case waddling into a Bozeman courtroom next week. Kennedy’s Ruby River swath is set up like a Fort Knox of good trout fishing and the Atlanta media mogul doesn’t like to share, despite laws…

Rio Colorado

Most Endangered: Colorado

The Colorado River isn’t our biggest, but it’s one of the hardest working in the country. It flows more than 1,400 miles. Through seven states. And its dammed, diverted, and heavily siphoned flows sustain tens of millions of people, as well as fish and wildlife. It’s also in a world of hurt. As of this…

Frank1

Frank Moore’s Return

I first met Frank Moore at his Oregon home, while steelheading on the North Umpqua River a couple of years back. As we went in for introductions, the harmless looking old-timer proceeded to grip and shake my puny hand with the crushing power of a gorilla. To say Moore is tough, is an understatement. As…

National

5 New National Monuments

In addition to coaxing Bo into his daily dump on the White House lawn, Obama has been busy declaring national monuments this week. Awesomely, and thanks the Antiquities Act, a President can protect public land through these designations—effectively bypassing Congressional holdups in the process. Theodore Roosevelt did it first when he protected Wyoming’s Devils tower back…

Squatch

‘Squatch Watch

Steelhead and ‘squatch have something in common. They range in areas dry of major development and soaked in mystique. And those pursuing both have appetites that go way, way beyond scientific benchmarks for sanity. Sasquatch occupies wide spaces in the imagination department. Steelhead, too… but at least we’ve got more than a couple grainy old…

Ruby

Public Trust (and Mistrust)

The great fishing states of Utah and Montana both saw critical public access announcements earlier this week. On the good news front, a 4th District judge rejected much of the Utah’s legal “reasoning” defending a 2010 law that restricts public access to rivers crossing private land, ruling that the public trust doctrine protects recreational use of…

Rio3

Rio: Monumental Designation

TAOS, NEW MEXICO—After years of collaboration, the iconic Rio Grande del Norte area is finally slated to be protected as a national monument next week. According to TU the monument will be designated on Monday at the request of a diverse group of local interests including hunters, anglers, and traditional land users.